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Classes and Contact Info

Thank you for checking out my presentation topics. I've taught classes and workshops at the Chicago Botanic Garden and the Morton Arboretum since 1997. I also do programs for libraries, garden shows, historical societies, local garden clubs and other organizations. Almost all of the digital photographs used in my presentations are from gardens I've visited in the Midwest and from my own one-acre garden, Wildwood. I rarely do the same exact program because I'm always looking for interesting plants. Fees vary by location and length of program. 

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Buckingham Fountain Revisited @ Wildwood Garden.  

For more info on upcoming classes, or to schedule a presentation, contact info@thisgardencooks.com or 708-217-9357.

2018 Programs 

Saturday, Feburary 3, 8-4 p.m. Central Region Symposium--The Perennial Plant Association. The Morton Arboretum.  

Thursday, February 8. 1:15 p.m. From War Gardens to Victory Gardens.  Bensenville Garden Club, Bensenville Library.   

Saturday, February 17, 9-11 a.m. Seed Starting for the Edible Garden. The Morton Arboretum.

Thursday, February 22, 7-9 p.m. Seed Starting for the Edible Garden.  The Morton Arboretum.

Saturday, February 24. 8-4. This Old House: Midwestern Gardens from Past to Present.  And Creating a Butterfly-Pollinator Garden. The University of Illinois Master Gardener Conference.

Monday, March 19. Midwestern Garden Design. Western Springs Garden Club.  

Tuesday, March 20. 10-Noon, Outside the Bungalow, Chicago Botanic Garden

New! Bungalows and Arts and Crafts-inspired houses are typically charming smaller homes found in cities and suburbs across the country. These popular style homes are appealing because they were often designed to be in harmony with nature and outdoor living. Discover how plants, hardscape, and other elements can enhance your own bungalow garden. 

Tuesday, March 20, 1-3 p.m., Growing a Cook’s Garden, Chicago Botanic Garden

If you have a spot in your garden, balcony, or deck that receives more than six hours of direct sunlight, you can grow fresh herbs and vegetables. We’ll cover how to grow the best essential ingredients for your kitchen: tomatoes, onions, peppers, squash, garlic, and leafy greens. In this class, you’ll learn the basics of soil preparation, planting in pots, plant selection, protecting your harvest from pests, extending the crops from spring through fall, and ideas for food preparation.   

Thursday, March 22, 6:30-8:30 p.m.  Early Bloomers--Plants for Spring Color. The Morton Arboretum.

Saturday, April 7.  Edible Gardens. The Morton Arboretum. 

Tuesday, April 10. 1 p.m.  Simple Pleasures: Weed Less, Enjoy your garden more! Garden Club of Park Forest 

Wednesday, April 11. 7 p.m. Gardening for Butterflies. Homer Glen Library.  

Friday, April, 13. 1 p.m.  Cress Creek Garden Club, Naperville. Topic TBD

Saturday, April 14.  Painting Your Garden with Plants (2 sessions: sun/shade) Chicago Botanic Garden

Sunday, April 29. 10:30-11:30--Growing Greens followed by a cooking class with Mary Kay Gill at the Chicago Botanic Garden. Learn to grow and use spring salad greens in this unique gardening and cooking class. Start by learning how to grow spring salad greens such as different types of lettuce, spinach, and kale, as well as some cool-season salad fixings like radishes, small Parisian carrots, peas, and spring onions. Because many of these edibles have very small root systems, they can be grown in pots as well. Then, gain inspiration for hearty, seasonal salads at this demonstration cooking class featuring recipes from Patricia Wells’ Salad as a Meal. Lunch will be served.

Saturday, May 5, 9:30 - Noon. Grow Great Peppers!  The Morton Arboretum.

Thursday, May 10, 7-9 p.m.  Grow a Cut Flower Garden. The Morton Arboretum.  

Saturday, May 12, 1-3 p.m. American Home Garden Design 1832-Present. Chicago Botanic Garden. 

Sunday, September 9. TBD. Chicago Daylily Society.  

Other 1-hour classes (call or email for more information):

 

From Pen to Print: Local Gardens featured in the Chicago Tribune and Chicagoland Gardening Magazine.  

American Home Garden Design: 1830 to the Present:  Draw inspiration for your own garden from the history of home garden design! We'll look at how home garden design has changed since the Midwest was first settled. Learn more about design evolution, the rise of the suburban lawn movement, foundation plantings, cottage gardens, moon gardens and heirloom plants to name a few. We'll take the best of these design ideas and examine how they can be used in your own garden, no matter what age or style home you own. (This is also offered as a 3- and 6-hour design class.)

The Artful Gardener: Breathing New Life into Your Garden. Thinking outside the Phlox.  Coloring outside the lines.  Yes, you ARE an artist in your garden.  A look at public and private gardens--from the quirky and magical to the elegant innovative (and their creators) -- and the plants and garden art within them. If you need inspiration, this is for you. 

 

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Herbal Tea Gardens

Grow a Cook's Garden 

Create a Hummingbird/Butterfly Garden

Cottage Garden Designs for the Midwest

Moon Gardens: What's old is new again

The Gardener as Artist: Designing with Plants & Structures

Growing Edibles: Everything You Want to Know to Harvest Your Own Food 

Simple Pleasures--Inspiration for Gardeners

Gardening in Small Spaces

Containers and Window Boxes:  The Wow Factor  

Designing with Color, Texture and Form

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Questions or Comments?  Email info@thisgardencooks.com

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The patio above is planted with Evolution salvia (an All-America Winner selection), sweet alyssum, petunias, red fountain grass, a few pots of Garden Peach tomatoes and basil, lavender and pots of hibiscus and calibrachoa for the many ruby-throated hummingbirds that are present from late April through early October.  The color palette is in mauve, purple, pink, violet, rose, blue and white--a nod to my English mother's design sensibilities.  No reds or oranges here.  Except when you get up to the eggplant-colored arbor, which is surrounded by a deep red salvia--another hummingbird favorite.

Salvia guarantica
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Salvia guarantica is my all-time favorite hummingbird nectar plant. It's like Salvia splendens on steroids, sending out its twisty stems in every direction.  The hummingbirds in fall migration are wild for the nectar. Great in containers or in a flower bed in full sun.  Just add sweet alyssum, vinca, zinnias and you're good to go.

Autumn Joy
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Sowing Veggies in Late Summer for a Fall Harvest

Observe.  Reflect.  Bloom!

(c) 2017 Nina A. Koziol